HOT SPOTS FOR HISTORY – 5 FANTASTIC CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY MUSEUMS

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museums in Cambridge

It is not surprising that there are so many well renowned historical museums in Cambridge, the University itself, around which the city formed, was founded in 1209 and has been through much history. From Saxon trading markets to the English Civil War, Cambridge has seen and withstood many tumultuous events. As Cambridge University, largely considered one of the best in the world, has had so many prestigious graduates and teachers, it is not surprising that many of them have helped to find many top quality museums and historically educational sites across this ancient city. There are five University Museums Below a few of them, suitable for all ages and an enlightening and enriching experience for those staying in hotels in Cambridge UK.

Fitzwilliam Museum

In 1816, Richard, VII Viscount Fitzwilliam of Merrion left his huge collection of artifacts and paintings to the University of Cambridge, who created and named this museum after him. The Museum is the largest of the five University of Cambridge Museums and holds within its columned walls a vast collection of Titian, Veronese, and Rembrandt and Palma Vecchio masterpieces. There are also a number of Ancient Egyptian artifacts and a vast collection of engravings, one of Fitzwilliam’s passions.

The Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology

Founded in 1884, this museum holds many local artefacts from the city’s history, dating back to Viking settlements in the Bronze Age. The museum also holds a vast range of international artifacts, charting archaeological discoveries in Polynesia and much of the South Pacific. It is run by the department of Archaeology and Anthropology and can be located on Downing Street.

The Polar Museum

Founded by Cambridge University’s department of Geography, the Polar Museum is a research centre and museum in memory of Captain Robert Falcon Scott. As well as having a museum charting the heroic age of exploration, the centre also holds an institute researching the Arctic and Antarctic, as well as humanities, social sciences and environmental science issues surrounding climate change and beyond.

Sedgwick Museum

Celebrating the world of Earth Sciences, the Sedgwick Museum holds over 2 million rocks and fossils which have been amassed since the 1840’s. Its current centre on Downing Street was even opened by King Edward VII in 1904.

The Museum of Classical Archaeology

Since 1983, the faculty of classics has run this centre, exploring ancient Greek and Roman artifacts. Artifacts found at the museums Sedgwick site on the University Campus include one of the longest surviving collections of plaster casts of Roman and Ancient Greek sculptures. These casts include ones of Hercules, the Barberini Faun and the Charioteer of Delphi.

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